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#076: Home Is the Hunter (TOS #52)

This week, Kirk squares off with Totally-Not-Q, who banishes three of his officers to tumultuous moments in Earth’s past. While he learns how to play nice with the Klingons and work out the god-alien’s inscrutable morality, his missing crewmen struggle to reconcile their desire to return to their own time with the obligations they’ve committed to in their new surroundings. What’s a ghargh? Is Kirk always this whiny? Why don’t children ever just listen? It’s the book with a special appearance by John Larroquette!

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Judgment Rites Week 8: …Yet There Is Method In It

(This is really late, I know. Christmas and all. Sorry to anyone who was invested in it!)

Picking up immediately where the previous mission left off, it’s clear right off the bat we’re not in Kansas anymore. Geometric shapes stand out against a dense star field, and a giant three-eyed head of lettuce presides over the group. This is it: the final test.

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Judgment Rites, Week 4: Light and Darkness

“Light and Darkness” is the second part of the game’s major story arc, and it cuts right to the chase: there’s some kind of distress signal coming from Onyius II, go check it out. The economy of storytelling is impressive. No drawn-out space battles, no jibber-jabber—simply straight to the action.

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Judgment Rites, Week 2: Sentinel

While surveying Balkos III, the USS Demeter is subjected to an incredibly powerful scan—an occurrence you don’t generally expect from a species still in its stone age. Feeling uncomfortably exposed, Commander Gellman retreats and tags in the Enterprise, and the standard Kirk/Spock/Bones trio beams down to the site from which the scan originated.

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#055: Strike Zone (TNG #5)

This week, we meet the Kreel, who have spent over a century being the Klingons’ punching bags. But when the Kreel find an abandoned stash of powerful weapons on a backwater planet, the tables turn, and shockingly, the Klingons start to feel like maybe peace, love, and understanding aren’t such bad ideas after all. Meanwhile, Wesley Crusher has a burdensome boy-genius reputation to live up to, and he intends to maintain it by singlehandedly attempting to cure a friend’s terminal illness. How much does Riker’s beard annoy Picard? Did Worf just decide to leave all pretense of professionalism at home today? Do some people deserve to be bullied? And perhaps the most important question of all: does this book have The Knack, or The Rot?

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