Tag: crew member has a long-lost relative

#147: The Better Man (TOS #72)

This week, a treaty renegotiation brings aboard an ambassador who dredges up memories of a somewhat lopsided rivalry for Dr. McCoy. But when Bones learns he’s a father again, he’ll have a dickens of a time remembering the right name to write on the birthday cards. Would McCoy make a good politician? Is this secretly a YA novel? And how long can we all keep pretending to care about Howard Weinstein’s résumé? All this and more in The Better Man, the book that hopes its fake ID is believable.

#058: Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (TOS)

Yesterday marked the celebration of Thanksgiving in America, and what better way to commemorate the occasion than to review the Star Trek film that features an unexpected family reunion? Spock’s half-brother abruptly shows up, and already he’s asking to borrow the car. It’s kind of a hoopty, but he’s on a mission from God, or so he says. Sybok’s campaign of feeling everyone’s pain is getting a lot of votes, and Kirk has to find a way to secure his incumbency before Sybok makes it to the center of the galaxy and rolls out his popular God-meeting agenda. It’s the week where I learned to stop worrying and love everyone’s least favorite Star Trek film. Will my credibility ever recover? I’d have to have some first!

#015: Corona (TOS #15)

When I bought this book from the used bookstore where I often buy my Star Trek paperbacks, the clerk offhandedly said “Oh, cool, Greg Bear” like I’m supposed to know who that is. In fact, Greg Bear has, at that same bookstore, an entire row of a shelf in the science fiction section filled solely with books written by him, so there’s no doubt he’s a highly prolific author who’s probably done something cool. This, however, is his only Star Trek novel. Is there a reason for that? Usually, there is.

#011: Yesterday’s Son (TOS #11)

Another Star Trek novel opens with yet another fawning introduction by a figure of some import within the community. This time, it’s written by Howard Weinstein, still fairly fresh off his own pretty decent Trek book, The Covenant of the Crown. I’ve previously pontificated on the questionable utility of these obnoxiously obsequious prefaces, but in Ann Crispin, Weinstein is fortunate enough to finally have a subject on whom such words aren’t wasted.

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén